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Chronology of Christian Spirituality: A.D. 800 - A.D. 1274

A.D. 800, First Iconoclastic Period

(Miniature from the 9th-century Chludov Psalter with scene of iconoclasm)

MIDDLE AGES (800 - 1274)

Iconoclastic controversy took place in the Greek church over the veneration of icons (726 - 843)

Images banned in 726

Veneration restored in 787 at the Second Council of Nicaea

Iconoclastic Council

A.D. 900, Second Iconoclastic Period

(St. Theodore, Preslav, 900 AD, Sofia)

Iconoclasm returns in 815

Abbey of Cluny in Burgundy (909) founded for monasticism (Cluniac Reform)

Christianization of Russia (988) is marked by Prince Vladimir of Kiev's baptism having followed Queen Olga of Kiev's baptism.

1054 Schism between Roman and Eastern Orthodox churches

A.D. 1100

(LEFT) Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard receiving a vision and dictating to her scribe and secretary, (RIGHT) St Bernard in a medieval illuminated manuscript

Hildegard of Bingen; Saint Gertrude of Helfta; Bernard of Clairvaux

Resources

The Cambridge history of Christianity. Vol. 1, Origins to Constantine [electronic resource], edited by Margaret M. Mitchell and Frances M. Young

The Cambridge history of Christianity. Vol. 2, Constantine to c. 600 [electronic resource], edited by Augustine Casiday and Frederick W. Norris 

Atlas of medieval Europe, edited by David Ditchburn, Simon MacLean and Angus MacKay

Benedictine culture, 750 - 1050, edited by W. Lourdeaux and D. Verhelst

Imago Dei : the Byzantine apologia for icons by Jaroslav Pelikan

Ecumenical Councils fo the Church

Constantinople IV (869)

Lateran I (1123)

Lateran II (1139)

Lateran III (1179)

Lateran IV (1215)

Lyons I (1245)

Lyons II (1274)

Iconoclasm

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Art

The Lindisfarne Gospels, created c. 700

The Book of Kells, created c. 760